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911 (991) GT3 – Correction Detail

January 30th, 2015

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

After a lengthy delay (eighteen months from the date the order was placed!) this GT3 was finally delivered to its new owner and then brought out to us for its first ever detail. A couple of engine related fires in the early batch of cars lead to Porsche recalling all of those that had already been delivered and delaying the production of those that were still to be built. This particular car fell into the latter category, so it was eventually delivered with the revised engine fitted straight from the factory. Keen to experience the engine screaming towards its 9,000rpm limiter, the owner managed to squeeze just over 700 miles onto the clock before he delivered the car to us, in an effort to get it through its running in period as quickly as possible (and, after an eighteen month wait, who could blame him?!). Notwithstanding this, it was pretty clean upon arrival. The brief for this detail was to apply the best protection possible, so a warrantied GYEON Q2 Quartz Protection Package was agreed upon. With the detail not due to commence until the following day, I parked the car inside our studio and was about to leave for the day when I noticed some nasty looking paint defects under the intense fluorescent lighting. I reached for our 3M Sun Gun and checked the car over more carefully panel by panel and was dismayed to find that every single one was blighted by buffer trails, sanding marks and random scratches. So much for this being a Protection Detail; based on what I could see, I knew that at least a couple of days of machine polishing was going to be required as well…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

With a few late nights ahead of me, I made an early start the next day. Unfortunately, torrential (sideways!) rain put paid to taking any pictures of the wash and decontamination stages, but I soggily worked my way through the following steps. After a thorough initial rinse I used a 10:1 (water:product) solution of Auto Finesse Imperial to gently clean the wheels; this was agitated using PB Boar Hair Detail Brushes and PB Luxury Wheel Woolies before being rinsed off. I then used Autosmart Tardis to remove a number of minor tar spots and some underseal overspray from the inner rim surfaces (this is a surprisingly common issue on new Porsches).

Next, I used Auto Finesse Citrus Power to clean the tyres and, with the help of an old large wheel woolie, I also gave the arches a thorough going over. I then foamed the whole car with Auto Finesse Avalanche, which was left to dwell for ten minutes before being rinsed off (well, I tried to let it dwell for ten minutes but the rain washed most of away well before then!). While the foam was dwelling I used Citrus Power to clean the shuts, grills and engine bay, this time agitating it with a pair of PB Boar Hair Detail Brushes. Using GYEON Q2M BATHE and a Microfiber Madness Incredimitt, I then carefully hand washed the whole car (two bucket method) before rinsing it off again. A few tar spots survived this process so I once again used Tardis to remove them; this also took care of some stubborn adhesive residue left behind from the protective wraps that were applied at the factory and subsequently removed by the dealership.

By this point in the detail the paint appeared to be squeaky clean, but I moved the car inside and applied Auto Finesse Iron Out to the whole exterior anyway, just to ensure that any microscopic iron contaminants were safely removed. After a few minutes a rash of purple spots on many parts of the bodywork confirmed the value of this preparatory step. After moving the car back outside and rinsing off the Iron Out, I moved it inside again and performed a little bit of spot claying to remove a small number of stubborn black spots randomly dotted over the bodywork. Once these were removed I pat dried the main panels with a PB Luxury Drying Towel and then used our Metro Vac Air Force Blaster to blow the shuts, grills and wheels dry.

With the car now clean and dry I re-inspected the bodywork with our 3M Sun Gun and marked all of the defects with small pieces of 3M High Performance Masking Tape in order to make things easier once polishing (it’s not easy to keep track of where defects are on white cars as they aren’t as visible as on darker coloured cars, so I find highlighting them at the outset eliminates the risk of me missing any as I work my way around the car). As you can see in the following picture, quite a large number of defects were present considering it was a virtually brand new car…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

A few of the worst affected panels needed an initial hit with the rotary (this was the first time I’d had to use my Makita in ages!); I used a Lake Country Rotary F-W Pad and Menzerna Power Finish (234) to fully remove the scratches present. On the rest of the panels I switched back to my normal correction setup; the cutting components of the Meguiar’s DA Microfibre System (DA Microfibre Cutting Discs and DA Microfibre Correction Compound) on my FLEX XC 3401 VRG Positive Drive Orbital Polisher

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Finally, once all of the correction work was done I went back over all of the panels, refining the finish with Menzerna Power Finish (203S) on a Lake Country Hydro-Tech Polishing Pad

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

After two full days of machine polishing the car was finally ready to be protected with the GYEON Q2 Quartz Protection Package we offer, which includes Q2 MOHS+ for the bodywork, Q2 RIM for the rims, Q2 TIRE for the tyres, Q2 TRIM for the trims, Q2 VIEW for the glass, Q2 FABRICCOAT for the carpets/mats and Q2 LEATHERCOAT for any leather present…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

After removing all traces of polishing dust with a PB Lambswool Duster and thoroughly wiping down all of the exterior surfaces with GYEON Q2M PREP, I applied two initial coats of Q2 MOHS to the bodywork…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

The following picture shows how much product I used during this process, with the masking tape highlighting the fill line before I began (a little goes a long way)…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

After leaving the Q2 MOHS to cure overnight I finished off the MOHS+ application by applying Q2 PHOBIC; this sacrificial topcoat adds terrific slickness and gloss, and serves to repel contaminants and protect the underlying layers of Q2 MOHS…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Next, I treated the rims and tailpipes with Q2 RIM, and sealed the awesome looking sidewalls on the Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres with Q2 TIRE…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

To finish the exterior off, I treated the glass with the contents of the Q2 VIEW kit and sealed the light clusters and a few small sections of trim with Q2 TRIM. Every single panel (and window) was then baked at 60°C for 10 minutes using our infra-red heatlamp; this effectively force cures the coatings, which helps to maximise their durability…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Finally, the bodywork (including the shuts and that in the engine bay) and rims were given a wipe down with GYEON Q2M CURE, which adds even more slickness to the finish and is a fantastic product to work with… as long as you remember less is more!

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Being almost brand new, the interior was pretty much spotless so after a simple wipe down and thorough vacuuming the carpets and mats were proofed with Q2 FABRICCOAT and the leather was sealed with Q2 LEATHERCOAT. The glass was then cleaned with Auto Finesse Crystal and given a final check for smears with our 3M Sun Gun…

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

With a manufacturer backed two year warranty underpinning the protection applied to the bodywork, this GYEON-protected GT3 is now ready to face whatever is thrown at it, which is just as well really, as the owner took the following day off his work to stretch its legs over on the West Coast of Scotland in some typically Scottish torrential rain!

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Porsche 911 (991) GT3 - Correction Detail

Clark @ PB

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13 Responses to “911 (991) GT3 – Correction Detail”

  1. Ellie says:

    Thanks for sharing this article with us!

  2. Stuart McCallum says:

    Thanks for taking the time to document this detail, it’s really inspiring. Great photos too.

  3. Kevin Davis says:

    Excellent detailing, stunning GT3.

  4. Stelian says:

    Stunning work Clark. Congrats! I use GYEON products and I like them very much!

  5. Ivan McKenna says:

    Yet another great write up. This is an area which definitely sets Polished Bliss apart from other detailing companies. Every part, from the photographs, attention to detail, to the passion displayed by your work, is utterly fantastic. Thanks again.

  6. Alley Kahn says:

    I really appreciation a detailer who takes pride in their work and more so their workshop! For a “garage” your place is spotless. You guys should’ve made a video of this car as you did with the Ferrari Enzo.

  7. Matt Slater says:

    Another awesome PB detail. Awesome in every respect. You guys set the level we should all aspire to. Thanks for taking the time to document it.

  8. Jason Bahia says:

    Great work guys! Out of interest, why was 203S used for refining over something like 106FA?

  9. Thanks for all of the kind words everyone – we’re glad you’re enjoying our work and write ups.

    @Jason – The wool pads and microfibre cutting discs left behind some deep marring that a finer finishing polish would have struggled to remove in a single step. Thus, we opted to use 203S as it’s guaranteed to remove such marring on the first attempt, but it also leaves a beautiful finish as long as you take your time and break it down fully.

  10. Richard says:

    I agree with everyone’s comments on this post. Awesome work and the videos were exceptional. I have a 2013 Porsche Panamera GTS and have been learning to detail my car but nothing like you have done with the 911 GT3. Is there a product line in the US that’s is comparable to GYEON? Also is there a detailing shop which does similar work on the east coast? I am in New Jersey. Thanks, Rich.

  11. @Rich – Many thanks for your kind feedback; it’s much appreciated. The good news for you is that GYEON is available in the US from Esoteric – the owner of Esoteric (Todd Cooperider) is one of the very best detailers in the US, and if you drop him a line he will likely be able to recommend a detailer closer to you who will meet your required standards.

  12. Lee says:

    Stunning work as ever, and equally impressive write up and photos! A couple of questions if that’s ok? How long do you generally find 203s to take to break down fully? Secondly, what wattage are the fluorescent lights in your studio? I presume you have a mixture of halogen and metal halide in there?

  13. @Lee – Thanks! Generally speaking 203S only takes 2-3 minutes to break down, assuming you are working at a moderate speed and applying light pressure. Obviously you can force the matter by ramping up the speed and pressure, but it’s not how we like to work. Paint type also plays a role in the process, with harder paints enabling more rapid breakdown of the abrasive particles (if there’s no ‘give’ in the finish the particles are ground down more quickly). Turning to the lighting; we use a fixed array of Sylvania Activa 6ft 70W 4600 Lumen 6500K full spectrum daylight balanced tubes (no metal-halide). This provides general lighting, while we rely on our 3M Sun Gun and a number of other handheld light sources (e.g. prototype Clulites) for checking our correction work.

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